Is it okay to question God?

We do have the freedom to talk to God about anything—even if it is to ask Him why He allowed (or didn't allow) something to happen. In Habakkuk, you'll find the prophet questioning God's choices about timing and how He carried out His plans. Right in verse one, he cries out, "O Lord, how long shall I cry for help, and you will not hear?"

Instead of getting upset with Habakkuk, God answered Him quite patiently, explaining why He did what He did, reminding him how He had saved Him in the past, and giving him encouragement for the future. In the end, Habakkuk praised God for His wisdom and protection, at one point saying, "Yet I will rejoice in the Lord; I will take joy in the God of my salvation" (Habakkuk 3:18).

Now, keep in mind that God doesn't always answer this clearly or in the way we want Him to. After all, it's not like He's a machine through which we can place orders. But you can be assured that He will always be honest, and He will always tell you what you need to hear when you need to hear it. Trust that His timing is right in how much He reveals to you.

The Right Attitude

There is nothing wrong with asking God, "Why did this happen?" or even saying, "I wish this didn't happen." God knows what's going on in your heart, and He welcomes you to talk to Him about the things that worry you. But make sure that you are being honest with Him too and giving Him the right attitude.

What is the right attitude to have when questioning God? Hebrews 11:6 says that "anyone who comes to [God] must believe that he exists and that he rewards those who earnestly seek him." God will listen to the prayers of those believe.

Having doubts is one thing and a totally natural and normal thing to feel. We all sometimes wonder why things happen the way they do. God would love to talk to you about your doubts. He's not intimidated or afraid of anything we have to say. He loves you and wants to communicate with Him.

On the other hand, having a bitter or untrusting heart that approaches God with a rebellious spirit is definitely another thing. Attacking God's ability to make the best choices for us or demeaning His character is both disrespectful and hypocritical. When we come to God that way, it's like we're throwing a tantrum instead of truly seeking an answer—simply venting rage instead of looking for actual help.

Think of it this way: it's the difference between an angry little toddler who screams, "You're the worst mom ever!" and a kid who is honestly saying, "Why did this happen to me?"

When you want to "question God," do a quick heart check. Are you approaching Him humbly? Is your mind open to what He has to say? Or are you just trying to vent? You can't expect an answer unless you're genuinely interested in His answer. ;-)





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Catiana Nak Kheiyn is the webmaster and editor of 412teens.org and regularly teaches local young writers at her workshops. She also contributes at GotQuestions.org, Blogos.org, and GQkidz.org. When Catiana is not writing or hanging out with teens, she loves spending time with her family—a mountain man, an adorable little girl and boy, four socially awkward cats, and a curly-tailed dog.